Tuesday, April 19, 2011

What is Bioremediation?

Simply put, bioremediation is the act of using microorganisms and their enzymes to clean up contaminants. The bioremediation field has been growing steadily since the 1980’s and recently gained a lot of media attention for the part it played in cleaning up the BP oil spill. During the clean-up, microorganisms were added to the Gulf of Mexico in order to order to break down the petroleum. This same bio-technology was used for the Exxon Valdez oil spill, where it was first proven effective on a large scale.

Bioremediation is also widely used in agriculture, for preparing soil and controlling livestock waste. It can effectively break down chlorinated pesticides, dioxin and ammoniated hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can purify ground water, clean the air, prevent the off-gassing of Volatile Organic Chemicals (VOCs), and even accelerate the half life of radioactive compounds! For this reason, it will likely be widely used in Japan as the country recovers from the devastating earthquake and subsequent nuclear meltdown. Other examples of bioremediation include bioventing, bioreactor, composting, bioap>Simply put, bioremediation is the act of using microorganisms and their enzymes to clean up contaminants. The bioremediation field has been growing steadily since the 1980’s and recently gained a lot of media attention for the part it played in cleaning up the BP oil spill. During the clean-up, microorganisms were added to the Gulf of Mexico in order to order to break down the petroleum. This same bio-technology was used for the Exxon Valdez oil spill, where it was first proven effective on a large scale.

Bioremediation is also widely used in agriculture, for preparing soil and controlling livestock waste. It can effectively break down chlorinated pesticides, dioxin and ammoniated hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can purify ground water, clean the air, prevent the off-gassing of Volatile Organic Chemicals (VOCs), and even accelerate the half life of radioactive compounds! For this reason, it will likely be widely used in Japan as the country recovers from the devastating earthquake and subsequent nuclear meltdown. Other examples of bioremediation include bioventing, bioreactor, composting, bioaugmentation and biostimulation. Bioremediation may be used to break down heavy metals such as arsenic, lead, and mercury. Scientists, however, need to develop specific techniques to do this in the field.

There are numerous advantages to bioremediation. First and foremost, it is ecologically sound. Iugmentation and biostimulation. Bioremediation may be used to break down heavy metals such as arsenic, lead, and mercury. Scientists, however, need to develop specific techniques to do this in the field.

There are numerous advantages to bioremediation. First and foremost, it is ecologically sound. It is one of the most environmentally responsible ways to treat contamination. Secondly, it allows you to treat areas that are difficult to reach, including underground and deep in the ocean. It is also less expensive than traditional cleanup techniques which often require excavation, incineration and mechanisms for pumping. Lastly, it is safer than traditional techniques and does not place humans in harm’s way.

While it may sound like something from a scifi movie, you can apply bioremediation in the home in some very useful ways. It is highly affordable, effective, eco-friendly and in most instances it replaces potentially harmful chemicals. Teragainx recommends a versatile product like EM-1 that can be safely used in a myriad of ways including:

  • As a composting accelerator
  • In septic tanks
  • For deodorizing around the home and controlling pet odor
  • To enhance gardens and household plants – bacteria prime the soil so that it is moisture and nutrient rich similar to a natural fertilizer

To learn more about how bioremediation products like EM-1 microbial inoculants can be used in your home, visit Teraganix online.

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